The lunar swirl of Reiner Gamma

The Moon is host to a type of bright, curvy features which are quite glaringly called swirls. Seen below is the lunar swirl “Reiner Gamma”.

Beautiful and bright lunar swirl, Reiner Gamma. Source: LROC WAC image on Wikipedia

Lunar swirls are brighter than their surroundings despite having the same composition. Unlike the rest of the lunar surface, the material within the swirls is not exposed to the constant weathering from solar wind and meteorites. This means the material remains fresh/bright for a long amount of time. But what protects the material from the harsh lunar environment? Local magnetic fields!

The Moon doesn’t have a global magnetic field (though it used to in the distant past) but it does have local magnetic anomalies. And it turns out, all swirls on the Moon are associated with a local magnetic field. These local magnetic fields provide protection to the swirl surface from the harsh lunar environment and help retain its bright and distinct look. How do such swirls form though?

To get an understanding of the swirl formation process, we need to precisely measure the local magnetic field strength of regions within the swirl. We also need to measure the solar wind interaction with the swirl’s magnetic field, and see how the local plasma environment is shaped by the magnetic field. A landing mission to Reiner Gamma would be key to understanding these intriguing features and their origin.

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